Posts tagged Endurance Training
The Training Effect

Every sound training plan should be like building blocks. Each activity in succession should build on the one before and have specific purpose. This week I thought some explanation of what the “training effect” is would be interesting to everyone. 
Currently we at Running Niche have about 20 athletes on the Lydiard Method training getting ready for target races in April and May. They have concluded their Aerobic Base Building phase which started last November and early December and most have just finished their strength building phase by integrating hill training for several week. This phase prepares the gluts, legs etc to handle more intense efforts which comes in the next phase. Now they are moving into Phase 3, which is the Anaerobic Development phase. More on what this phase is about next week.
First its important to understand the “training effect” or the principle of training adaptation. A training effect is realized once an appropriate workload is applied and appropriate recovery allowed. When you tax your body with a hard effort if you don’t allow it to recover, the next hard workout you do will only break you down and eventually lead to sickness and injury. If you allow your body to recover properly then you start you next hard effort workout at a higher level of fitness and will be able to stress your body at a higher level. Each one builds on the prior to increase your fitness. 
This above diagram depicts this concept of continuous improvement due to the training effect. Catabolism refers to the training stress applied such as endurance work or lactic acid tolerance workload. Anabolism refers to workouts which allow recovery such as easy aerobic runs. The single most common mistake runners make is running another hard workout before they have recovered from their prior one. If you follow this principle regardless of the training phase you are in, you will get more out of your time and effort put into training. This concept becomes particularly important during the Anaerobic phase of the Lydiard Method where you begin to train your body to get used to the very uncomfortable state of oxygen deficit.
Remember, all workouts on the Lydiard Method have a specific purpose and are sequenced accordingly to maximize the “training effect”. If you would like to learn more about the science and performance-based Lydiard Method, stop by the store. We are always happy to talk about your running!

Bob Dyer (Co-owner, Running Niche)
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Don't Run Hard Until You Can Run Easy

It’s been VERY cold here in St. Louis. On these tough cold days, you just can't go very fast. So, you go very easy. Arthur Lydiard used to say; "We all know our limitations. You keep within your limitations and you will improve..." And you WILL improve.

Those of you who might be thinking: "Wow, my Aerobic run pace on this Lydiard Plan through the Running Wizard seems so slow! How can I expect to run my target race at the target race pace?"

Your pace will naturally quicken without extra effort. Trust the program and keep it to the prescribed effort/pace especially when the weather is harsh. This is the time to grow your “roots” underground.

Also remember that each workout has a purpose in the Lydiard Method. In the case of your long Aerobic runs the purpose is developing endurance and efficiency of oxygen utilization at the cellular level. You should easily be able to pass the “talk test” on these runs, its not about pace but time on your feet.

Additionally, on the Lydiard plan, the day prior to your long Aerobic run, typically a Saturday, the workout is shorter but faster, usually a “out and back” at distances of 3-10 miles depending on your target race distance. This run is done at a faster pace overall, but focusing on running comfortably at this faster pace and coming back in your second half of the workout about 10% faster. Then of course Sunday is your long Aerobic recovery run.

Remember, all workouts on the Lydiard Method have a specific purpose and are sequenced accordingly to maximize the “training effect”. More on this one next week. Stop by to talk training anytime!