Posts tagged Running Stores Near Me
Lydiard Phase 5: Taper

An optimum period of time to train for a full or half marathon is 18 – 24 weeks. Sunday June 9 would be the last start day for Chicago Marathon training (October 13) for an 18-week program.

The Lydiard Method is comprised of 5 phases, in sequence, each of which builds specific systems you will need to perform at your peak during your goal race.

The fifth phase is called Taper and typically is 1-3 weeks in length. The prior 4 phases have allowed you to develop aerobic and anaerobic capacities, your recovery systems, muscular and cardiac strength and provided either increased endurance or speed as needed. The work has been done so the Taper phase allows you to fully recover, replenish your vital physical and mental stores and be 100% ready on race day.

Your workload is decreased and is just enough to allow you to maintain your fitness level. Aerobic runs are now Long Jog’s and Jog’s which are slower and shorter. There is one short, quick, up tempo run 3 days prior to your goal race. If you are on a 6-7-day plan there will be one session of 50/50’s.

You will completely stock up your glycogen stores and you will put on a couple pounds during the week preceding the race. You will lighten up as you get a few miles into your race so don’t worry.

Do not be tempted to try out your fitness in an unscheduled race. This is called “picking the flower by the roots”. You will be feeling great, energized and ready but save it for the goal race! Remember all the training you have done to prepare you for your day and the target race. That’s all that matters now.

Please stop in the store to learn more about the Lydiard Method. We are trained Lydiard coaches and can help you sign up. While your personalized plan costs $100, and goes to a non-profit, we provide the day to day coaching at no additional charge.

Bob Dyer (Co-owner, Running Niche)
LinkedIn | Facebook | Instagram

Lydiard Method Phase 4
Lydiard Method Phase 4

An optimum period of time to train for a full or half marathon is 18 – 24 weeks. May is the time to begin your work and start your training plan for your fall goal race.

The Lydiard Method is comprised of 5 phases, in sequence, each of which builds specific systems you will need to perform at your peak during your goal race.

The fourth phase is called Integration and typically is 4 weeks in length. The prior 3 phases have allowed you to develop aerobic and anaerobic capacities, your recovery systems and muscular and cardiac strength. Integration now prepares you to run your target race distance, begin recovery and is your bridge to peak fitness.

The key changes which occur during integration are bringing the systems that have been developed together to allow you to run at your aerobic threshold and stead state comfortably. It also teaches you to handle that fine line between aerobic and anaerobic threshold and access when you are in anaerobic. And, critically important, teaches pacing skills and race day practice.

This is accomplished through simulating race conditions via time trials, controlled out & back runs and races. During this phase you will also add in short fast sprinting workouts called 100/100’s or 50/50’s which prepares you to handle a fast pace towards the end of your race.

Keep in mind during Phase 4 long aerobic runs are switched to long jogs while aerobic runs are still a key element of the phase as is easy fartlek and cut downs. This is also the time to learn what you still need. Is it more endurance or more speed? Integration is where these skills are either dialed up or dialed down depending on where your gap is. Also, your mileage continues to decrease while the intensity increases allowing the beginning of total recovery leading into tapering phase.

Please stop in the store to learn more about the Lydiard Method. We are trained Lydiard coaches and can help you sign up. While your personalized plan costs $100, and goes to a non-profit, we provide the day to day coaching at no additional charge.

Bob Dyer (Co-owner, Running Niche)
LinkedIn | Facebook | Instagram

Running vs. Training
Aerobic Recovery Run Example.jpg

I’ll take a pause this week from reviewing the phases of Lydiard training to focus on the difference between running and training and the importance of aerobic recovery runs. Next week I’ll talk about Phase 4 of Lydiard Training; Integration.

We use the word “training” when discussing the Lydiard Method because that’s what it is. A systematic program with 5 phases and specific purposeful workouts within each phase designed to get the runner to the starting line of their goal race healthy, fit and ready to perform their best. The secret sauce to Lydiard training is how and when workouts are scheduled. Running is just that, running with no end game in mind or plan to stress and recover so your body can achieve an increase in fitness.

Coach Lydiard used to say frequently to his runners, “You have to run slower, to enable you to run faster”. In talking with many runners recently this concept is hard for folks to wrap their heads around. When we present the concept of slow aerobic runs which build the aerobic engine at the Mitochondria level and serve to allow the body to recover from harder faster runs, we often hear “I can’t run that slow”. But then we discover that runners run a lot of their workouts at their “race pace” yet in their race they can’t hold that pace for the duration of the distance. This is the difference between “running” and “training”. Both are equally important depending upon the goals and desires of the individual involved.

Here is a recent example of a runner I am working with. This individual is at a fitness level whereby they can run a mile around 4:25, yet they do their long aerobic recovery run at 7:50 per mile with a very low heart rate. Depending on how they feel I’ve also seen 8:00-8:15. This runner is mastering the art of running slower to enable them to run faster, at the right times either in specific workouts or races and recover properly allowing them to handle the next hard run properly.

As you make your decisions about your fall goal races and what you desire to achieve consider whether you are running or are you actually training. The latter is very different from the former.

The time is now, not July, to start your training for fall goal races. Please stop in the store to learn more about the Lydiard Method. We are trained Lydiard coaches and can help you sign up.  While your personalized plan costs $100, and goes to a non-profit, we provide the day to day coaching at no additional charge.

Bob Dyer (Co-owner, Running Niche)
LinkedIn | Facebook | Instagram

Lydiard Method Phase 3: Anaerobic Development

Given it's time already to decide on your Fall goal race and training approach, the next few TTT’s will be focused on summarizing the key elements of each phase within the Lydiard Method. An optimum period of time to train for a full or half marathon is 18 – 24 weeks. May will be the time to begin your work.

The Lydiard Method is comprised of 5 phases, in sequence, each of which builds specific systems you will need to perform at your peak during your goal race.

The third phase is called Anaerobic Development and typically is 4-6 weeks in length. This phase prepares your body to endure the uncomfortable state of oxygen deficit. Why is this important? Because as you get into race situations you will encounter demands of high intensity which cannot be met by your aerobic capacity.

The key changes which occur during this phase are that anaerobic training teaches your body to create buffer enzymes for anaerobic metabolism or lactic acid. You also will become much better and judging your pacing and you will build efficiency at faster paces.

Lydiard Method Phase 3

This is accomplished through one or two interval sessions per week, depending on the number of days you run a week. If you run 4-5 days you will get one session each week, if 6-7 days then you will get two sessions. Typically, an interval session is 5k to 7k in total excluding warmup and cooldown. They can be done in repeats of 200m up to 2 miles. If you are training for the half or full marathon your intervals are usually at least 1000m each. In between you jog until your heartrate reduces to around 130. This ranges between 1-3 minutes depending on the individual. An example would be 4x1mile at ¼ effort. In each personalized Lydiard plan you will be provided your pace which equals ¼, ½ or ¾ effort based off of your calculated plan race pace. Intervals generally are done at ¼ to ½ effort. Another example would be 7x1000m. We tend to work these individually as everyone reacts differently to this anaerobic stress and we based it off of the prior week’s effort, how it was handled, jog time between to get heartrate down etc.

Recovery time is critical for anaerobic workouts as you need to allow yourself at least 48 hours between session. A 6-7 day a week runner would do theirs on a Tuesday and Thursday but we do move them around and adjust them according to how the runner is recovering.  

Keep in mind during Phase 3 there are still long aerobic runs, easy fartlek and a faster progress calibration run (more on this one later).

Please stop in the store to learn more about the Lydiard Method. We are trained Lydiard coaches and can help you sign up. While your personalized plan costs $100, and goes to a non-profit, we provide the day to day coaching at no additional charge.

Bob Dyer (Co-owner, Running Niche)
LinkedIn | Facebook | Instagram

Lydiard Method Phase 2: Hill Training

Given its time already to decide on your Fall goal race and training approach, the next few TTT’s will be focused on summarizing the key elements of each phase within the Lydiard Method. An optimum period of time to train for a full or half marathon is 18 – 24 weeks. The month of May will be the time to begin your work.

Lyd Hill Phase Two.png

The Lydiard Method is comprised of 5 phases, in sequence, each of which builds specific systems you will need to perform at your peak during your goal race.

The second phase is called Hill Training and typically is 4 weeks in length. This phase introduces power and flexibility in the leg’s muscles. Why is this important? Because this will prepare you for anaerobic training in phase 3 which is faster and more demanding.

The key changes which occur during this phase are leg speed, resistance to pounding and creates much needed power and flex in your legs.

This is accomplished through one or two hill workouts per week depending on the # of days you are running. Running up the hill is down slowly as its meant to be plyometric in nature. The slower you go up the more resistance will be felt and better results created. You find a hill 200m – 400m in length, run up it slowly with good knee lift. Jog at the top then stride downhill at a fast-relaxed pace. At the bottom do 3x75m-100m strides. The workouts build from 1-2 circuit repeats to 3-4 over the phase. This is not an anaerobic workout!

Keep in mind during Phase 2 there are still long aerobic runs, easy fartlek and a faster out/back or progress calibration run.

Please stop in the store to learn more about the Lydiard Method. We are trained Lydiard coaches and can help you sign up. While your personalized plan costs $100, and goes to a non-profit, we provide the day to day coaching at no additional charge.

Bob Dyer (Co-owner, Running Niche)
LinkedIn | Facebook | Instagram