Posts tagged St. Louis
Warm Up and Cool Down

Two very important aspects of any good training plan are time and attention placed on proper warmup and cooldown. Coach Lydiard always ensured any runners he was working with started and ended their sessions with warmup and cooldown.

A solid warmup should be considered the first part of your run. It warms up your muscles and gets your ready for your main run. Usually this takes about 10-15 minutes and you should jog then gradually increase your pace naturally as your body gets ready. There also is a more formal warmup done prior to an interval session for example that involves 10-15 minutes of jogging, 3-6 100m stride outs then a few minutes jog.

The warmup should never be eliminated, rushed or cut short as it gently allows all your systems to kick in prior to moving into the workout and reduces the chance of injury.

A good cooldown should always be done after a faster workout. And if that workout is anaerobic in nature it should be at least 15 minutes and as long as 30 minutes jogging. It aids in recovery and stimulates blood flow to metabolize acidity and tissue damage incurred during the workout. Never skip the cooldown as this will increase the chances of illness and injury. One way to think of this is the cooldown begins the process of getting your body ready for your next workout.

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As you can see here in this picture from Pre’s log, even he always included a good warmup and cooldown in his workouts.

Please stop in the store to learn more about the Lydiard Method. We are trained Lydiard coaches and can help you sign up. While your personalized plan costs $100, and goes to a non-profit, we provide the day to day coaching at no additional charge.

Bob Dyer (Co-owner, Running Niche)
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Lydiard Method Phase 3: Anaerobic Development

Given it's time already to decide on your Fall goal race and training approach, the next few TTT’s will be focused on summarizing the key elements of each phase within the Lydiard Method. An optimum period of time to train for a full or half marathon is 18 – 24 weeks. May will be the time to begin your work.

The Lydiard Method is comprised of 5 phases, in sequence, each of which builds specific systems you will need to perform at your peak during your goal race.

The third phase is called Anaerobic Development and typically is 4-6 weeks in length. This phase prepares your body to endure the uncomfortable state of oxygen deficit. Why is this important? Because as you get into race situations you will encounter demands of high intensity which cannot be met by your aerobic capacity.

The key changes which occur during this phase are that anaerobic training teaches your body to create buffer enzymes for anaerobic metabolism or lactic acid. You also will become much better and judging your pacing and you will build efficiency at faster paces.

Lydiard Method Phase 3

This is accomplished through one or two interval sessions per week, depending on the number of days you run a week. If you run 4-5 days you will get one session each week, if 6-7 days then you will get two sessions. Typically, an interval session is 5k to 7k in total excluding warmup and cooldown. They can be done in repeats of 200m up to 2 miles. If you are training for the half or full marathon your intervals are usually at least 1000m each. In between you jog until your heartrate reduces to around 130. This ranges between 1-3 minutes depending on the individual. An example would be 4x1mile at ¼ effort. In each personalized Lydiard plan you will be provided your pace which equals ¼, ½ or ¾ effort based off of your calculated plan race pace. Intervals generally are done at ¼ to ½ effort. Another example would be 7x1000m. We tend to work these individually as everyone reacts differently to this anaerobic stress and we based it off of the prior week’s effort, how it was handled, jog time between to get heartrate down etc.

Recovery time is critical for anaerobic workouts as you need to allow yourself at least 48 hours between session. A 6-7 day a week runner would do theirs on a Tuesday and Thursday but we do move them around and adjust them according to how the runner is recovering.  

Keep in mind during Phase 3 there are still long aerobic runs, easy fartlek and a faster progress calibration run (more on this one later).

Please stop in the store to learn more about the Lydiard Method. We are trained Lydiard coaches and can help you sign up. While your personalized plan costs $100, and goes to a non-profit, we provide the day to day coaching at no additional charge.

Bob Dyer (Co-owner, Running Niche)
LinkedIn | Facebook | Instagram

Lydiard Method Phase 2: Hill Training

Given its time already to decide on your Fall goal race and training approach, the next few TTT’s will be focused on summarizing the key elements of each phase within the Lydiard Method. An optimum period of time to train for a full or half marathon is 18 – 24 weeks. The month of May will be the time to begin your work.

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The Lydiard Method is comprised of 5 phases, in sequence, each of which builds specific systems you will need to perform at your peak during your goal race.

The second phase is called Hill Training and typically is 4 weeks in length. This phase introduces power and flexibility in the leg’s muscles. Why is this important? Because this will prepare you for anaerobic training in phase 3 which is faster and more demanding.

The key changes which occur during this phase are leg speed, resistance to pounding and creates much needed power and flex in your legs.

This is accomplished through one or two hill workouts per week depending on the # of days you are running. Running up the hill is down slowly as its meant to be plyometric in nature. The slower you go up the more resistance will be felt and better results created. You find a hill 200m – 400m in length, run up it slowly with good knee lift. Jog at the top then stride downhill at a fast-relaxed pace. At the bottom do 3x75m-100m strides. The workouts build from 1-2 circuit repeats to 3-4 over the phase. This is not an anaerobic workout!

Keep in mind during Phase 2 there are still long aerobic runs, easy fartlek and a faster out/back or progress calibration run.

Please stop in the store to learn more about the Lydiard Method. We are trained Lydiard coaches and can help you sign up. While your personalized plan costs $100, and goes to a non-profit, we provide the day to day coaching at no additional charge.

Bob Dyer (Co-owner, Running Niche)
LinkedIn | Facebook | Instagram

Time Trials

Many of our Lydiard Method training runners are moving into Phase 4 which is called “Integration”. This phase comes after having built a strong base having completed the prior phases called Aerobic, Hill Strengthening and Anaerobic. The Integration phase is the bridge between anaerobic and peaking. Workouts within this phase are designed to simulate race conditions.

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One of the key workouts within Integration are Time Trials. This run is a great time to practice pacing skills, simulate race conditions, get used to racing flats if worn and try different fueling strategies. Time trials are actually done at up to 90% of racing effort. These are best done by actually entering races to fully experience the entire process from pre-race through to cool-down. Be sure your warmup and cooldown appropriately for time trials and under no circumstances should one sprint at the end as this increases the likelihood of injury. Save it for the real target race! Also, one important hint, do not start out too hard in a time trial, work your way into it. And keep at 90% or below effort. (Graphic ©Lydiard Foundation).

With GO! races 4 weeks out now, the timing is right to jump in a couple races as a part of your training. Do not “race” them and be sure you understand what is important to get out of the workout. Time trials are the closest simulation to actual race situations that you will encounter. If you would like to learn more about the Lydiard Method, stop by the store as we enjoy talking about training, particularly yours!

Bob Dyer (Co-owner, Running Niche)
LinkedIn | Facebook | Instagram